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Misono Swedish Carbon Steel Gyuto 210mm (8.2")

99263

Specifications

Style : Gyuto
Length : 210mm (8.2")
Weight : 5.8 oz (165g)
Blade Steel Type : Swedish Carbon Steel
Handle Type : Composite Wood
HRC : 60
Bevel Angle Ratio : 70/30
Cover : Not included

Swedish Carbon Steel

Misono Swedish Carbon steel series is made with Swedish carbon steel, with a high level of purity and each knife is hand-ground and finished. Being pure carbon steel, these knives will react to moisture and acidity present in foods and may cause some discoloration; this is harmless and natural. We recommend that a rust remover is purchased in conjunction with these knives to remove patina and possible rust that may form. Letting a patina (black iron oxide) form on the outside of the blade will reduce further reactivity with foods and make the blade's surface more stable.

These knives are very easy to sharpen and maintain; they may be maintained with a honing rod although we always recommend stones as the preferable method of maintenance. The steel is very easy to deburr and achieves a keen edge with ease.

Gyuto Knife

The Gyuto (lit. Cow Sword) is an adaptation of the French chef knife profile for the Japanese market. While the name cow sword would imply that this knife is meant only for meat, its versatility is the same a Santoku and can be used as a general-purpose knife for any task. Many would consider a Gyuto or chef's knife to be the one essential knife for any kitchen with all other knives being secondary. Compared to a German style chef's knife, a Gyuto will have a somewhat flatter profile: this profile lends itself well to push-cutting which is common for Japanese chefs, as opposed to rock-chopping. Gyuto also tend to be thinner at the edge as well as the spine than most European chef's knives and as a result have less lateral toughness and care should be taken not to torque the blade while cutting to minimize the risk of chipping.