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Kintaro White #2 Kurouchi Gyuto 240mm (9.4")

99475

Specifications

Style : Gyuto (Chef's Knife)
Length : 240mm (9.4")
Weight : 6.6 oz (187g)
Special Feature : Kurouchi, San Mai (Carbon Steel Core, Iron Clad)
Blade Steel Type : Hitachi White #2
Handle material : Ho wood with Pakkawood ferrule
HRC : 61
Bevel Angle Ratio : 50/50
Cover : Not included

Kintarō Shirogami Kurouchi

This line of Kintarō are made with Hitachi White #2 core steel jacketed in soft iron cladding with a Kurouchi (forge scale) finish. These knives are a great option for those considering a foray into carbon steel knives as they are thin out of the box and sharpen to a keen edge with ease. The Kurouchi finish will help mitigate some of the reactivity of the cladding, but please be aware that this knife can still patina and rust if not cared for. We recommend wiping the blade clean and dry after use and coating with Tsubaki oil if you plan to store it long-term. A Sabitoru or Pikal metal polish may be used to remove undesired patina or rust.

All Kintarō knives have a rounded choil for a more comfortable grip, a nice distal taper with a thin tip for precision cuts and an excellent grind. We recommend thinning and treating the bevels on each side of the knife as you would a single bevel; sharpening them as you go to maintain the knife's geometry over time.

San Mai

San-mai (lit. three sheets) is a style of manufacture common for Japanese knives. A more practical translation is "three layers", referring to the core hardened steel being jacketed with soft steel. These style of knives may seen being referred to as "clad" or "kasumi", which has some overlap with a similar style of manufacture called Ni-mai or "two layers". Ni-mai is commonly found in single bevel knives where the soft steel is only on one side of the knife with a small portion spilling over to the other side.

About Kintaro

Kintarō knives are produced in Takefu knife village in Fukui Japan by a blacksmith collective headed by Yoshimi Kato, the son-in-law of Hiroshi Kato. Yoshimi Kato has stepped in to fill his father-in-law's shoes and has done so admirably, producing knives with a high level of attention to detail. Kintarō produces some of the most desirable carbon steel knives available in the United States today and we're excited to be carrying them.

Gyuto (Chef's Knife)

The Gyuto (lit. Cow Sword) is an adaptation of the French chef knife profile for the Japanese market. While the name cow sword would imply that this knife is meant only for meat, its versatility is the same a santoku and can be used as a general-purpose knife for any task. Many would consider a gyuto or chef's knife to be the one essential knife for any kitchen with all other knives being secondary. Compared to a German style chef's knife, a gyuto will have a somewhat flatter profile: this profile lends itself well to push-cutting which is common for Japanese chefs, as opposed to rock-chopping. Gyuto also tend to be thinner at the edge as well as the spine than most European chef's knives and as a result, have the less lateral toughness and care should be taken not to torque the blade while cutting to minimize the risk of chipping.