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Knives > Kurosaki

Kurosaki SG2 Shizuku Gyuto 240mm (9.4") Hammered (Tsuchime)

81047

Yu Kurosaki is a talented young blacksmith based out of Takefu, Japan who is best known for his use of intricate forged tsuchime patterns to differentiate his lines. All of his knives have forged distal taper and an aggressive Scandi grind resulting in a very thin edge that glides through produce with ease.

The Shizuku line we carry are all made using R2/SG2 steel which takes an exceptional edge and keeps it for a long time. The stainless cladding resists corrosion and makes maintenance simple.

Specifications

• Brand : Kurosaki Cutlery
• Style : Gyuto
• Blade Length : 240mm (9.4")
• Blade Steel Type : Core R2/SG2 Powdered Steel
• Handle material : Rosewood with Pakkawood ferrule
• HRC : 63
• Bevel Angle Ratio : 50/50
• Cover : Not included

Gyuto Chef's Knife

The Gyuto (lit. Cow Sword) is an adaptation of the French chef knife profile for the Japanese market. While the name cow sword would imply that this knife is meant only for meat, its versatility is the same a santoku and can be used as a general-purpose knife for any task. Many would consider a gyuto or chef's knife to be the one essential knife for any kitchen with all other knives being secondary. Compared to a German style chef's knife, a gyuto will have a somewhat flatter profile: this profile lends itself well to push-cutting which is common for Japanese chefs, as opposed to rock-chopping. Gyuto also tend to be thinner at the edge as well as the spine than most European chef's knives and as a result, have the less lateral toughness and care should be taken not to torque the blade while cutting to minimize the risk of chipping.